Read Weird, Episode 07: “Fairy Tale is Form, Form is Fairy Tale” by Kate Bernheimer

Hello, friends, it’s another episode of the Read Weird podcast! Join us every other week for a conversation about writing, reading, and teaching weird and experimental fiction.

In this episode, we discuss Kate Bernheimer‘s essay “Fairy Tale is Form, Form is Fairy Tale“, and give you some weird reading recommendations.

Subscribe for fortnightly episodes of Read Weird via Apple PodcastsStitcherTuneIn, or the podcatcher of your choice.  For more notes on this episode, see below. Stay weird!

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Read Weird, Episode 6: “I Am A Knife” by Roxane Gay

Well, what do you know, it’s another episode of the Read Weird podcast! Join us every other week for a conversation about writing, reading, and teaching weird and experimental fiction.

In this episode, we discuss Roxane Gay‘s short story “I Am A Knife“, and guest contributor Daniel Knowlton talks about Jim Shepard’s short story collection Love and Hydrogen.

Subscribe for fortnightly episodes of Read Weird via Apple PodcastsStitcherTuneIn, or the podcatcher of your choice.  For more notes on this episode, see below. Stay weird!

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Read Weird, Episode 05: Strangeness from Language

Hello-ello, it’s another episode of the Read Weird podcast! Join us every other week for a conversation about writing, reading, and teaching weird and experimental fiction.

In this episode, we discuss techniques and exercises that use language to create strangeness, and listener Scott talks about Hunter S. Thompson’s Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas.

Subscribe for fortnightly episodes of Read Weird via iTunes, Stitcher, TuneIn, or the podcatcher of your choice. For more notes on this episode, see below. Stay weird! Continue reading

Read Weird, Episode 04: “Fever Dream” by Samanta Schweblin

Would you look at that, it’s another episode of the Read Weird podcast! Join us every other week for a conversation about writing, reading, and teaching weird and experimental fiction.

In this episode, we discuss a Samanta Schweblin’s novel Fever Dream, and Jonathan Wlodarski talks about reading Julie Andrews.

Subscribe for fortnightly episodes of Read Weird via iTunesStitcher, TuneIn, or the podcatcher of your choice.  For more notes on this episode, see below. Stay weird!

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Read Weird, Episode 03: “The Botanist’s House” by Kathryn Davis

Hey hey, it’s another episode of the Read Weird podcast! Join us every other week for a conversation about writing, reading, and teaching weird and experimental fiction.

In this episode, we discuss an excerpt of Kathryn Davis’s novel The Silk Road, titled “The Botanist’s House”, and guest contributor Vanessa Wang recounts her formative experience reading Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.

Subscribe for fortnightly episodes of Read Weird via iTunesStitcher, TuneIn, or the podcatcher of your choice.  For more notes on this episode, see below. Stay weird!

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Read Weird Podcast, Episode 02: “A Message from the Emperor” by Franz Kafka

Hooray, it’s another episode of the Read Weird podcast! Join us every other week for a conversation about writing, reading, and teaching weird and experimental fiction.

In this episode, we discuss the short story “A Message from the Emperor” by Franz Kafka, and Lindsay recounts her formative experience reading Karin Tidbeck’s short story “Beatrice”.

Subscribe for fortnightly episodes of Read Weird via iTunesStitcher, TuneIn, or the podcatcher of your choice.  For more notes on this episode, see below. Stay weird!

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Read Weird Podcast, Episode 01: “Dinner” by Amelia Gray

Welcome to the first episode of the Read Weird podcast! Join us every other week for a conversation about writing, reading, and teaching weird and experimental fiction.

In this episode, we talk about our philosophy of weirdness, discuss the short story “Dinner” by Amelia Gray, and recount Carlea’s formative experience reading Aimee Bender’s The Girl in the Flammable Skirt.

Subscribe for fortnightly episodes of Read Weird via iTunes or Stitcher.  For more notes on this episode, see below. Stay weird!

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Weird Book Club: Duplex, Kathryn Davis

Read Weird’s back, and we’ve got our next Weird Book Club pick!

In case you missed our inaugural Weird Book Club earlier this year, here’s how it works: every other month, we’ll announce a new title for the Weird Book Club. We’ll read the book together, and at the end of the following month, we’ll check in with discussions, reviews, and the like.

Our September-October Weird Book Club pick is Duplex by Kathryn Davis!  Join us Sunday, October 16 @ 1 PM EDT to discuss Duplex!

 

April Weird Book Club Begins at 1 PM EDT!

Hi everyone! Don’t forget our April Weird Book Club discussion of Helen Oyeyemi’s What Is Not Yours Is Not Yours begins in a little over half an hour, at 1 PM EDT over on Goodreads.

Come prepared to discuss with your thoughts, questions, and critiques.  We can’t wait to hear what you think!

Don’t have a Goodreads account? You can respond in the comments section of this post, or participate on Twitter by using the hashtag #weirdbookclub.

See you there!

Are You Ready for April’s Weird Book Club?

To get you in the mood for this weekend’s Weird Book Club discussion about Helen Oyeyemi’s What Is Not Yours Is Not Yours, here are some relevant odds and ends for your enjoyment.

In her review of What Is Not Yours Is Not Yours in the New York Times, Laura Van Den Berg calls the collection “a cabinet of wonders,” and says, “Oyeyemi so expertly melds the everyday, the fantastic, and the eternal, we have to ask if the line between ‘real’ and ‘unreal’ is murkier than we imagined — or to what extent a line exists at all.”

Nor is it just the world on the page that seems to be half-enchanted. In this interview in Vice, Oyeyemi’s comments suggest that the small strangenesses of ordinary life make the barrier between the real and the unreal seem just as permeable as it is in fairy tales. Lines remembered from novels can disappear on rereading and objects like keys (which crop up again and again as symbols in What Is Not Yours . . .)  are only “supposedly inanimate.”

In the same interview, Oyeyemi also talks about the politics of representation, as well as her writing process, admitting, “I think slowly, but I write fast.” If you’d like to get more of a sense of Oyeyemi’s sensibilities as a writer and reviser, this writing playlist she put together for Granta is well worth checking out.

Hopefully this has got you excited about talking about What Is Not Yours Is Not Yours. Be sure to join us on goodreads this Saturday at 1 PM EDT for our inaugural Weird Book Club discussion!